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Lactose Free

Lactose intolerance, also called lactase deficiency and hypolactasia, is the inability to digest lactose, a sugar found in milk and to a lesser extent milk-derived dairy products.  Lactose intolerant individuals have insufficient levels of lactase, the enzyme that metabolizes lactose into glucose and galactose, in their digestive system. In most cases this causes symptoms such as abdominal bloating and cramps, flatulence, diarrhea, nausea, borborygmi (rumbling stomach), or vomiting after consuming significant amounts of lactose. Some studies in the U.S. suggest that milk consumption by lactose intolerant individuals may be a significant cause of irritable bowel syndrome.  Thanks Wikipedia!

If you are lactose intolerant, you may be able to take an over-the-counter additive to aid in lactose digestion.  However, for those of us who need to avoid all FODMAPs, these additives do not help.  However, the good news is that we can consume hard cheeses, lactose-free products (e.g., yogurt & milk) and vegan dairy alternatives (e.g.,  dairy-free butter, Tofutti ® ice cream and Tofutti ® Better Than Cream Cheese™) without difficulty … or at least not much difficulty.

In addition to lactose-free milk, there are several milk alternatives available.  Each is fairly distinctive and its flavor should be taken into account when using.  For example, almond milk is good for baking because it adds a hint of almond to your cakes, cookies & pastries.  Rice milk (original flavor), adds virtually no flavor, but is very thin and less effective as a thickening agent.  Soy milk is a reasonable thickening agent, but will definitely add a soy taste to whatever you are cooking

I suggest minimizing your cheese consumption, but below are some FODMAP friendly cheeses that I have found OK to consume:

  • Asiago
  • Brie
  • Camembert
  • Fontina
  • Gruyere
  • Parmesan
  • Kefalotyri

Apparently there are a lot of “hard cheeses”, but I’ve only tried the 7 listed above.  Below is a complete list of hard cheeses as categorized by www.cheese.com

The   following are “hard cheeses” — according to www.cheese.com

Abbaye du Mont des   Cats

Abertam

Ackawi

Acorn

Allgauer Emmentaler

Anejo Enchilado

Anthoriro

Ardi Gasna

Asiago

Balaton

Barry’s Bay Cheddar

Basing

Bavarian Bergkase

Beauvoorde

Berkswell

Blue

Boeren Leidenkaas

Bra

Buffalo

Cabrales

Caerphilly

Cairnsmore

Canestrato

Castellano

Castelleno

Castelmagno

Castigliano

Comte

Coolea

Coquetdale

Corleggy

Cotherstone

Cotija

Coverdale

Crayeux de Roncq

Crottin de   Chavignol

Curworthy

Cwmtawe Pecorino

Denhany Dorset Drum

Derby

Doolin

Dorset Blue Vinney

Double Worcester

Dry Jack

Duddleswell

Dunlop

Duroblando

Dutch Mimolette   (Commissiekaas)

Emmental

Etorki

Evora De L’Alentejo

Finlandia Swiss

Fiore Sardo

Folded cheese with   mint

Four Herb Gouda

Fourme de   Montbrison

Fribourgeois

Friesekaas

Friesian

Fromage a Raclette

Frying Cheese

Gabriel

Gammelost

Gaperon a l’Ail

Garrotxa

Gornyaltajski

Gospel Green

Gowrie

Grafton Village   Cheddar

Grana

Grana Padano

Graviera

Gruyere

Halloumi

Halloumy   (Australian)

Haloumi-Style   Cheese

Heidi Gruyere

Herriot Farmhouse

Iberico

Idaho Goatster

Idiazabal

Isle of Mull

Jarlsberg

Jindi Brie

Kadchgall

Kefalotyri

Laguiole

Lairobell

Lancashire

Laruns

Lavistown

Leafield

Leicester

Leyden

Lincolnshire   Poacher

Llanboidy

Llanglofan   Farmhouse

Loch Arthur   Farmhouse

Longhorn

Lou Palou

Mahon

Malvern

Manchego

Manur

Marble Cheddar

Menallack Farmhouse

Mihalic Peynir

Montasio

Monterey Jack Dry

Northumberland

Orkney Extra Mature   Cheddar

Oschtjepka

Parmesan   (Parmigiano)

Parmigiano Reggiano

Pecorino

Pecorino Romano

Penbryn

Piora

Plymouth Cheese

Pressato

Pyengana Cheddar

Queso del Tietar

Queso Iberico

Queso Majorero

Queso Para Frier

Raclette

Ragusano

Reggianito

Remedou

Ricotta Salata

Romano

Roncal

Saanenkaese

Sainte Maure

Salers

Sancerre

Sap Sago

Sardo

Sardo Egyptian

Sbrinz

Schabzieger

Serat

Seriously Strong   Cheddar

Shelburne Cheddar

Shropshire Blue

Smoked Gouda

Spenwood

Sraffordshire   Organic

Stinking Bishop

Swaledale

Swiss

Syrian (Armenian   String)

Tala

Teifi

Tillamook Cheddar

Tomme d’Abondance

Tyn Grug

Tyning

Ubriaco

Wellington

Wensleydale

White Stilton

Xynotyro

Yarg Cornish

Zamorano

Zanetti Grana   Padano

Zanetti Parmigiano   Reggiano

 

 

 

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  1. Thu Bordelon

    Food industry applications, both of pure lactose and lactose-containing dairy by-products, have markedly increased since the 1960s. For example, its bland flavor has lent to its use as a carrier and stabiliser of aromas and pharmaceutical products. Lactose is not added directly to many foods, because it is not sweet and its solubility is less than other sugars commonly used in food. Infant formula is a notable exception, where the addition of lactose is necessary to match the composition of human milk..^*^

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  2. Squashablanca

    Hey,

    I have a question about rice milk – so far, I looked at two brands (Rice Dream and TJ’s Rice Drink) and they are both made from brown rice. I do react to brown rice (not white), does that mean I am likely to react to these rice milks? Or do the fructans decompose in the preparation? I cannot have nut/almond milk or Lactaid either, so it’s rice or nothing.

    Thanks!

    Zaneta

    1. LIVING FODMAP Free

      Can’t find any information about whether the fructans from brown rice break down in the cooking process and can’t find a rice milk without brown rice. Can you have coconut milk?

    2. LIVING FODMAP Free

      Just posted a recipe for making your own rice milk! Hope it helps!

      1. Squashablanca

        Thanks so much! I’m looking for a way to make dairy- and soy-free yogurt, hopefully this will work. Coconut milk is currently on my ‘suspected’ list, I’ll give it another chance in a while. I haven’t managed to find anything about brown vs. white rice milk or flour, either, so I’ll probably stick with white for the time being.

        1. kate

          rice dream gives me reactions and i have to stick to coconut milk, but making your own with white rice is a great idea!

  3. mélanie goulet

    I seem to react on any kind of cheese even in small amounts. I can’t explain it?!? Is that common?

    1. LIVING FODMAP Free

      It is common! Most cheese contains lactose; only the hard cheeses are naturally lactose free. Do you react to all cheeses? Even extra sharp cheddar, fresh parmesan, asiago or fontina? These are tasty hard cheeses that may satisfy your need for cheese without causing a reaction.

  4. Laura Heffernan

    Where does Hemp milk fall into the FODMAP discussion?

    1. LIVING FODMAP Free

      Hemp milk is approved for the FODMAP diet!

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