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Dec 03

FODMAP Free doesn’t mean No Cheese

Hard cheeses are naturally lactose free and good for FODMAP free eating!

 

These aged cheeses  are crumbly and dry, but not shriveled up. They also have strong flavors, pungency and character. These not mild cheeses! They have a long shelf life and will continue to develop their flavor as they age.

 

Below is a list of hard cheeses.  You can also download a PDF of the list for easy reference.  HARD CHEESES

 

Cheese Name Flavor Color Texture Description & Uses
Asiago Sharp Light yellow Firm to very firm Italian-style cheese with sharp, rich flavor. Used for eating and cooking. Harder, more aged versions used for grating in ways similar to Dry Jack or Parmesan.
Carmody Medium sharp Light yellow Firm A firm, flavorful, smooth-textured table cheese that also melts well. Typically aged four to six months.
Cheddar Ranges from mild to extra sharp Light yellow to orange; may also be white Firm Cheddar describes a family of cheeses — very popular and versatile cheeses available in a range of flavors from mild to very sharp. Good as is and in sandwiches. Melts well and is very good in cooked foods or shredded and sprinkled on top. Also available in an organic version.
Cheddar (raw milk) Sharp, aged White Firm Unpasteurized (raw) milk plus aging gives Cheddar a delicious sharpness. Eaten as is, with crackers, bread or fruit.
Colby/Jack Mild to medium sharp White and yellow/orange Firm A blend of Colby and Jack used for eating, especially snacks and sandwiches. Also called CoJack and Calico.
Cotija Salty, pungent White Semi-firm to firm, crumbly Hispanic-style cheese similar to Feta. Crumble and sprinkle over cooked dishes, soups, beans and salads. Also called Queso Anejo (aged cheese). Some types may be very dry and hard (see Very Hard Cheeses section).
Edam Mild Yellow with wax coating Firm Similar to Gouda, Edam is very tasty as is, with crackers or other snacks.
Enchilado Aged, slightly spicy coating Red spice coating, white interior Firm, dry, crumbly Slightly aged Hispanic-style cheese with mild red chili or paprika coating. When aged longer (Anejo-style) may be quite hard. Heated, it softens but does not melt. Crumble onto Mexican foods, soups and salads.
Fontina Mild, nutty Light yellow Firm Mild, pleasant cheese for snacking and sandwiches, similar to Gouda and Edam. (A variation, Fontinella, is firmer and drier.)
Frying Cheese Mild, slightly salty White Firm A Middle Eastern-style cheese typically cut into slices and fried. Holds shape when hot. Top with sauces or salsa. Used for saganaki.
Gouda Mild, nutty Yellow with wax coating Firm A popular mild cheese, eaten as is for snacks, also in cooked foods, salads and sandwiches. Similar to Edam.
Gouda (raw milk) Sharp Light yellow Firm A Dutch-style cheese also called Boere Kaas. Has a sharper, more complex flavor than most Goudas due to use of raw milk and aging. Used for eating and cooking.
Havarti Mild, slightly tangy Pale yellow Semi-firm Mild cheese similar to Edam and Gouda. Used both for snacks and in cooked foods and salads.
Longhorn Mild to sharp Light yellow to orange Firm A form of Cheddar. Used as is and in cooked foods.
Port Salut (also Port du Salut or St. Paulin) Mild Light yellow Firm A French-style cheese similar to Gouda or Edam in taste and appearance. Eaten as is, but also good for cooking.
St. George Medium sharp Light yellow Firm Portuguese-style table cheese with a rich, medium sharp flavor.
Syrian (Armenian String) Mild White Firm A Syrian-style String cheese, similar to regular String cheese. Also for snacks and in cooked foods.

 

 

2 comments

  1. learn more

    TY for posting, it was very handy and told a lot. Can one reference a number of this on my page if I include a reference to this site?

    1. LIVING FODMAP Free

      Yes!

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